An analysis of the topic of the philemon letter

The scholarly consensus is that Paul wrote the Epistle to the Romans. Cranfield, in the introduction to his commentary on Romans, says: Today no responsible criticism disputes its Pauline origin.

Paul himself has witnessed the very real change that Onesimus has undergone. Paul previously invoked the term "heart" in reference to Philemon's demonstration of love and its "refreshing" effect on the saints v. Here the synecdoche 11 "hearts" becomes a metaphor to describe the intimate relationship that Paul has with Onesimus.

In sending him back to Philemon, Paul is risking no small part of himself. Perhaps Paul is also signaling that he is resolved to their separation if his appeal fails, 12 but even in such a case, the separation would be heart-breaking to Paul.

The pronominal movement of v. Philemon cannot respond to Onesimus in a vacuum; his response will have a significant effect on Paul, as well as on those who hear this letter read.

Again Paul keeps the fact of his imprisonment front and center in his appeal. He is not making this request from a place of wealth or leisure, but from a place of suffering for the gospel. If the previous section makes its appeal from Paul's interests in the matter of Onesimus, then the forth-coming section appeals to Philemon's interests.

Find helpful customer reviews and review ratings for Colossians and Philemon (Zondervan Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament) at metin2sell.com Read honest and unbiased product reviews from our users. Printed in , this book written by John Wesley Hanson offers a thorough examination the meaning of the Greek word AIÓN -- AIÓNIOS, translated Everlasting -- Eternal, proving it denotes Limited Duration. An Analysis of the Letter to Philemon. Brent Blackwell. The Church creates a better world. The Church challenges social injustices. The Church encourages liberty and basic human rights.

From Philemon's Interests 14a but without your consent I did not want to do anything, 14b so that your goodness would not be, in effect, by compulsion but of your own free will.

Having explained his own interest in Onesimus' reconciliation with Philemon, culminating in his desire to have Onesimus return to minister to him, Paul now makes a perspectival switch from his own interests to Philemon's interests in receiving Onesimus with grace.

The string of purpose clauses continues in v.

An analysis of the topic of the philemon letter

Paul also amplifies what he has just said in v. Paul's inactivity "I did not want to do anything" in v. Paul is apparently expressing two reasons for sending Onesimus back.

First, he wishes to have Onesimus returned to him in prison. Second, he wants Philemon freely to choose to be reconciled to Onesimus. However, these two reasons for Paul's actions are not so easily distinguished from one another. Onesimus' ministry to Paul goes hand in hand with Philemon's willingness to respond freely with a good conscience.

His gesture toward the eternal "forever" expands the theater of his appeal beyond the slave-master relationship to the spiritual, everlasting communion of saints. Onesimus' separation from Philemon v.

Paul also uses the passive verb "was…separated" in order to emphasize God's sovereign work in course of these events. This culmination of Paul's poetic tour de force effectively raises the stakes of his appeal: Philemon has the opportunity here to receive back not just a slave but a brother in Christ.

Paul applies Onesimus' conversion to the matter of reconciliation, amplifying what he meant by "hav[ing] him back forever.

Onesimus' status is escalated from "more than a slave" to "a beloved brother," cf. As a result he is to be regarded as a changed person, both in the ordinary sense "in the flesh" and in the spiritual sense "in the Lord". The series of short, staccato statements in v. First Request "Accept him as you would me.

Paul, having appealed to both his interests and Philemon's, now cuts short his appeal and states outright what Philemon should do. He has already said that he considers sending Onesimus the same as sending his own heart v. Paul maintains his humble posturing, referring to himself as a "partner" of Philemon, since what is to follow is not to be understood as an apostolic command but an appeal of an equal.

The three purpose clauses of the previous section are replaced by three imperatival clauses, of which this is the first. Paul clarifies his appeal to Philemon, but even his clarification falls short of telling Philemon exactly what he is supposed to do.

In this way, the indeterminacy of the appeal reminds Philemon that Paul is calling for a change of heart that should result in an acquisition of the right Christian perspective on the matter.The letter of Philemon was written by Paul the apostle along with Timothy.

Analysis of the Letter to Philemon

Paul was definitely the author and nothing needs to confirm that. The external testimony is unimpeachable. An Analysis of the Letter to Philemon. Brent Blackwell. The Church creates a better world.

50 Critical Analysis Paper Topics | Owlcation The page Overview of Bibblical Theology and the 25—page Overview of Biblical Ethics are excellent and, though many articles in the back of study Bibles are not used as often as the explanatory notes at the bottom of the pages, these should prove to be helpful.
About Us | Asian Journal Of Science And Technologies The author of this treatise has endeavored to put within brief compass the essential facts pertaining to the history and use of the word, and he thinks he has conclusively shown that it affords no support whatever to the erroneous doctrine.

The Church challenges social injustices. The Church encourages liberty and basic human rights. THE EPISTLE TO PHILEMON. Ph1lemon was perhaps a native, and certainly a resident, of the city of Colosse, one of the Colossian Christians, therefore, to whom the Epistle to the Colossians was written.

Colosse was a city in the southwest of Asia Minor, upon the banks of the river Lycus. Philemon apparently was a convert of the apostle Paul, though Paul had never made a visit to Colosse.

Book of Philemon Overview - Insight for Living Ministries

Printed in , this book written by John Wesley Hanson offers a thorough examination the meaning of the Greek word AIÓN -- AIÓNIOS, translated Everlasting -- Eternal, proving it denotes Limited Duration.

Epistle to Philemon topic. The Epistle of Paul to Philemon, known simply as Philemon, is one of the books of the Christian New Testament. It is a prison letter, co-authored by Paul the Apostle with Timothy, to Philemon, a leader in the Colossian church.

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An analysis of the topic of the philemon letter
AIÓN -- AIÓNIOS