The background of the nazi persecution of the gypsies

They are a distinctive group of people whose origins lie in nomadic tribes, and have been part of the culture of the world for centuries. Historical records show that they arrived in Europe in the 16th century, where they were first given the name of Gypsy.

The background of the nazi persecution of the gypsies

It was carried out primarily by German forces and collaborators, German and non-German. Early in the war, millions of Jews were concentrated in urban ghettos.

BACKGROUND AND TIMELINE

In Jews were massacredand by December Hitler had decided to exterminate all Jews living in Europe at that time. The European Jewish population was reduced from 9, to 3,; the world's Jewish population was reduced by one-third, from roughly Jewish populations were systematically deported from the ghettos and the occupied territories to the seven camps designated as Vernichtungslager extermination camps: In Sebastian Haffner wrote that in December Hitler began to accept the failure of his primary goal to dominate Europe after his declaration of war against the United States, and his withdrawal was compensated for by his secondary goal: Denmark evacuated nearly all its Jews to nearby, neutral Sweden ; the Danish resistance movementwith the assistance of many Danish citizens, evacuated 7, of the country's 7, Jews by sea to Sweden [30] in vessels ranging from fishing boats to private yachts.

The rescue allowed the vast majority of Denmark's Jewish population to avoid capture by the Nazis. Although Jews are an ethnoreligious groupthey were defined by the Nazis on purely racial grounds.

The background of the nazi persecution of the gypsies

The Nazi Party viewed the Jewish religion as irrelevant, persecuting Jews in accordance with antisemitic stereotypes of an alleged biologically determined heritage. Defining Jews as the chief enemy, Nazi racial ideology was also used to persecute other minorities.

According to British historian Ian Kershawthe Nazis' genocide and brutality was their way of ensuring Lebensraum "living space" for those who met Hitler's narrow racial requirements; this necessitated the elimination of Bolsheviks and Slavs: The Nazi revolution was broader than just the Holocaust.

Most of their three million men, from generals to ordinary soldiers, helped exterminate captured Slav soldiers and civilians. This was sometimes cold and deliberate murder of individuals as with Jewssometimes generalised brutality and neglect German soldiers' letters and memoirs reveal their terrible reasoning: Slavs were 'the Asiatic-Bolshevik' horde, an inferior but threatening race.

Documentation on the persecution of the Roma (Gypsies) is abundant in archives and other repositories throughout Europe, the United States, and even in Israel. In order to understand where material exists, basic background information on legislation against the . This find of shared genetic haplogroups may indicate an origin of the Romani people in or around these regions. Lewy, Guenter () "The Nazi persecution of the Gypsies." New York: Oxford University Press. Marushiakova, Elena & Popov, Vesselin () Gypsies in the Ottoman Empire. Roma in Auschwitz: Part 1 For Nazi Germany, the Roma became a racist dilemma. The Roma were Aryans, but in the Nazi mind there were contradictions between what they regarded as the superiority of the Aryan race and their image of the Roma people.

Only a minority of officers and men were Nazi members. The Polish Church experienced brutal persecution under Nazi occupation. Nazi crimes against the Polish nation The Nazi occupation of Poland was among the most brutal of the war, resulting in the death of more than 3 million ethnic Poles and about 3 million Polish Jews.

The six million Jewish, Roman Catholic and Orthodox Poles represented nearly 17 percent of the country's population. Intelligentsiasocially prominent and influential people were primarily targeted, although ethnic Poles and other Slavic groups were also killed en masse.

Hundreds of thousands of Roman Catholic and Orthodox Poles were sent to Auschwitz-Birkenau and other concentration camps, and the intelligentsia were the first targets of the Einsatzgruppen death squads.

The Holocaust in Ukraine Between andapproximately three million Ukrainian and other gentiles were killed as part of Nazi extermination policies in present-day Ukraine.

Generalplan OstGerman mistreatment of Soviet prisoners of warand Ostarbeiter Naked Soviet prisoners of war in Mauthausen concentration camp. During Operation Barbarossa the Axis invasion of the Soviet Unionmillions of Red Army prisoners of war were summarily executed in the field by German armies the Waffen SS in particulardied under inhumane conditions in German prisoner of war camps and death marches or shipped to concentration camps for execution.

The Germans killed an estimated 2. Holocaust Memorial Museum, by the winter of "starvation and disease resulted in mass death of unimaginable proportions". Thousands of peasant villages across Russia, Belarus and Ukraine were annihilated by German troops.Roma in Auschwitz: Part 1 For Nazi Germany, the Roma became a racist dilemma.

The Roma were Aryans, but in the Nazi mind there were contradictions between what they regarded as the superiority of the Aryan race and their image of the Roma people. This find of shared genetic haplogroups may indicate an origin of the Romani people in or around these regions.

Lewy, Guenter () "The Nazi persecution of the Gypsies." New York: Oxford University Press. Marushiakova, Elena & Popov, Vesselin () Gypsies in the Ottoman Empire. Roma in Auschwitz: Part 1 For Nazi Germany, the Roma became a racist dilemma. The Roma were Aryans, but in the Nazi mind there were contradictions between what they regarded as the superiority of the Aryan race and their image of the Roma people.

The Roehm Affair and Persecution of Homosexuals The leadership of the Nazi Party included at least one avowed homosexual, Ernst Roehm. Genocide of European Roma (Gypsies) Among the groups the Nazi regime and its Axis partners singled out for persecution on so-called racial grounds were the Roma (Gypsies).

Drawing support from many non-Nazi Germans who harbored social prejudice towards Roma, the Nazis judged Roma to . Holocaust victims were people who were targeted by the government of Nazi Germany for various discriminatory practices due to their ethnicity, religion, political beliefs, or sexual orientation.

Sinti and Roma: Victims of the Nazi Era — United States Holocaust Memorial Museum